Are There Times to Avoid Getting Botox?

Knowing when you should avoid Botox is usually something you can count on your surgeon for. But there are definitely times when maybe you should postpone your Botox injections—times when you might have to work around your busy social schedule or what’s happening in your life. Getting around these windows can help you get the most out of your Botox.

times to avoid botox

There might be times when you should avoid Botox. This doesn’t mean that you should never get the procedure, especially if you want it. But there might be certain windows of your life (big and small) during which getting Botox probably isn’t the best idea.

When to Avoid Botox and When to Embrace Injections

That’s okay. You can swing back to it later. But these timeframes to avoid should be of particular note if you’re thinking about getting Botox in the near future or if you’ve got regular maintenance injections scheduled. Being able to schedule those maintenance injections so your results never diminish is vital to many Botox patients.

So what are those times? When should you avoid Botox for a little bit? And how long are those windows. The answers, as ever, vary. But you should always check with your cosmetic surgeon before making any decisions about getting Botox (or getting more Botox).

Avoid Botox During Pregnancy

Most cosmetic surgeons will tell you to avoid Botox injections if you’re pregnant or might soon become pregnant. This is typically an instructions that surgeons give out of an abundance of caution. Yes, Botox has been shown (in some studies) to cause issues with birth. But those studies were performed on animals and those animals were given huge doses of Botox.

In other words, if you got a Botox injection and didn’t know you were pregnant, you shouldn’t worry. Studies have essentially shown that the Botox injection into the face do not travel very far in the bloodstream. This means that most pregnancies will not be effected in any way.

However, because of that abundance of caution, it might difficult to find a surgeon who will administer Botox while you’re pregnant (and you’d be best off listening to the advice of your surgeon). So it makes sense to plan around it.

Avoid Botox Before Your Next Big Activity

You might be planning to get Botox before Thanksgiving, or before a family reunion. You want to get your injections just before you see everyone! But it’s important to leave some time to recover from the injections and for results to start to show. Likewise, you don’t want to rush any activity after you get Botox. Let’s use the following examples:

  • Rigorous Exercise: You should probably avoid your marathon training for 24 hours or so after your injections. Same goes for vinyasa flow yoga. This could put pressure on the bloodstream in your face and increase bruising.
  • Going for a Swim: Okay, the swim part isn’t really going to be a problem (although it does count as a vigorous activity, so see above). Rather, it’s the beach that’s a problem. You should typically avoid laying down for two hours or so post-injection. And the sun and heat you experience at the beach could also lead to an increase in bruising (and potentially a diminishment of results).
  • An Important Social Gathering: Whether it’s your birthday or a wedding, an important social event is a great place to impress your friends and family. That’s why most people get Botox around this time. But it can take a few weeks for the results of Botox to become apparent. Additionally, you might be able to see some slight bruising for a few days. In other words, get your Botox week or two before any big, important events if you can.

Avoid Botox After Drinking and Headaches

Other than the occasional hangover, there’s not much that drinking and headaches have in common. However, both alcohol and pain relievers (the type of which you take for headaches) tend to thin out the blood. Generally, you’ll want to avoid Botox if you’ve:

  • Used specific over-the-counter pain relievers in the last seven days
  • Ingested a significant amount of alcohol in the past 24 hours

Now, to be sure, these are just general guidelines. You’re going to want to talk to your surgeon about what kind of behavior you really need to avoid and what medications might lead to poor interactions. Always communicate with your surgeon and follow your surgeon’s instructions. This blog is no substitute for actual medical advice.

Communications with your Surgeon

At the end of the day, it’s a great idea to keep communication with your surgeon open, especially when you’re thinking about an imminent injection. The more your surgeon knows about what’s happening your life, the easier it will be to know when you should avoid Botox—and when you should embrace Botox.

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